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Chile's contributions to the world.

Discover them here!

We are a creative
and resilient country,
connected from the southern edge
of the planet to the world.

A diverse, democratic republic spanning 4,300 km, with 7 different climates spread over 3 continents, and 19.5 million people who seek to create a better future together.

Ciencia y Conocimiento

SOUNDS of ALMA is an initiative that sought to interpret and decode the frequencies of the universe, transforming them into sounds, so that artists from all over the world could compose, share and create a community united by a quest that has captivated human beings for thousands of years.

Mano del desierto,
Mario Irarrázabal,
1992

KNOWLEDGE & SCIENCE

FROM THIS NATURAL LABORATORY OF THE PLANET, WE ADDRESS GLOBAL CHALLENGES, COLLABORATING AND SEEKING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT TO CREATE A BETTER FUTURE FOR CHILE AND THE WORLD.

NATURAL OBSERVATORY
OF THE COSMOS

40% of the planet's ground optical astronomical capacity!

With almost 90% of nights each year in the north of Chile being cloudless, scientific teams from more than 20 countries collaborate to observe and study the universe from some of the most important astronomical facilities on the planet.

With almost 90% of nights each year in Northern Chile being cloudless, scientific teams from more than 20 countries collaborate to observe and study the universe from some of the most important astronomical facilities on the planet.

Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), the main radio telescope on the planet.

Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the most advanced complex in the world.

Las Campanas Observatory, of the Carnegie Institute of the US.

La Silla Observatory (ESO)

Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

Great astronomical
discoveries from Chile

Learn about a series of great discoveries and astronomy research carried out from Chile, a country that has around 40% of humanity’s total capacity for observation.

First photograph of a Supermassive Black Hole

First photograph of a Supermassive Black Hole

In 2019 ALMA-APEX, together with observatories from other parts of the world, were part of the Event Horizon Telescope project. By combining the images from these telescopes, researchers obtained the first image of the event horizon of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Messier 87 galaxy. Neil Nagar, an astronomer at the Center for Astrophysics and Related Technologies (CATA), participated in this discovery.

Sister of the Milky Way

Sister of the Milky Way

In August 2020, using the ALMA telescope, a scientific team discovered the most distant galaxy with characteristics similar to the Milky Way (called SPT0418-47), 12,000 million light years away.

The closest Super-Earth

The closest Super-Earth

In January 2020, the exoplanet "Proxima Centauri c" was discovered. It has 6 times the mass of Earth and is located 4.2 light years from Earth. It is more similar in composition to our planet than Jupiter or Saturn, which are large masses of gas. Instruments located in La Silla and Paranal were used to detect it.

First supernova visible to
the naked eye in more than 400 years

First supernova visible to
the naked eye in more than 400 years

In 1987, supernova 1987A was discovered from Las Campanas. It was the first supernova visible to the naked eye in more than 400 years, and analysis confirmed the theory that elements such as iron were created in these types of explosions.

First image of an extrasolar planet

First image of an extrasolar planet

It was taken with one of the VLT telescopes at the Paranal observatory in April 2004. It is a giant planet, approximately five times larger than Jupiter.

"Heaven has such fervor,
and loves so much, gives so much,
that sometimes I desire
the night more than the mornings."

Excerpt from "Andean Night"
Gabriela Mistral

The vision of our experts

6,435 KM OF COAST AND THE LARGEST MARINE PROTECTED AREA IN LATIN AMERICA

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are a key tool in the fight against climate change and Chile is among the 15 countries in the world with the most protected surface area.

MPAs currently cover 42.3% of our Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and more than half are Marine Parks (no fishing), while 41.8% are Multiple Use Marine Protected Areas (AMCPMU).

“Chile has become a global leader in marine conservation. No other country has protected such a great diversity of marine environments, from sub-tropical islands to sub-Antarctic waters”.

ENRIC SALA

National Geographic Explorer in Residence and founder of Pristine Seas
October 2017 (during the announcement of the protection of more than 1 million km2 of marine parks)

THE HUMBOLDT CURRENT’S GREAT ECOSYSTEM

Chile is home to this important marine ecosystem,
one of the most productive on the planet!

Marine protected areas for the future of the White Continent

Since 2018, Chile and Argentina have presented a proposal at the meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), for the creation of a new Marine Protected Area (MPA) in the Antarctic Peninsula Domain 1 (AMPD1).

CHILEAN ANTARCTICA:
AN ECO INTO THE FUTURE

Chile has been present in Antarctica for 80 years, taking on a commitment to conservation, science, peace, the future and the planet.

Climate Change
Observatory

Chile has launched the Climate Change Observatory project in order to understand, predict and project the effects, risks and threats of changes in the ecosystem. The project provides information needed to develop mitigation and adaptation measures vital for the future, both for Chile and the world.

"The climate change observatory is an essential system for studying climate change and its effects —especially adverse— that we as a planet have caused. As a country, we have the privilege of being in a spectacular geographical location, with landscapes ranging from the driest desert in the world to mountain ranges, to Antarctica."

Dr. Gino Cassasa

Hydraulic Engineer, Master in Geophysics and Glaciology, Partner of the Climate Change Observatory

Marcelo Leppe

Director of the Chilean Antarctic Institute (INACH)

Bases in Antarctica
for research and
international collaboration

Marcelo Leppe

Director of the Chilean Antarctic Institute (INACH)

Chile has 4 permanent and 5 temporary bases in Antarctica. Currently researchers from 24 countries are affiliated with the National Antarctic Science Program (PROCIEN), which is managed by the Chilean Antarctic Institute (INACH):

Germany, Saudi Arabia, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, China, Korea, United States, Spain, France, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Norway, New Zealand, Poland, United Kingdom, Czech Republic, Romania, South Africa and Switzerland.

TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE

December 4, 2021, 7:34 AM (GMT-3)

In June 2019 and December 2020, the world connected with the power of nature through Chile, experiencing 2 spectacular eclipses, one in the north and the other in the south of our country.

This year, all eyes will be on the Chilean Antarctic, witness to the third consecutive eclipse in our country.

"There everything ends
and does not end:
there everything begins:
the rivers say goodbye in the ice,
the air has married the snow,
there are no streets or horses
and the only edifice
was built by stone."

Extract from "Antarctic Stones"
Pablo Neruda

97%

of foreign students
who studied in Chile would
recommend studying in the country. Source: Learn Chile Sector Brand Study - ProChile

“I needed to take some mandatory courses on earthquake engineering and that is why I chose to study them in the best country in the world for the subject. Also, I am fascinated by South America and Chile has seemed very different to me."

Michelangelo Buzzi

Civil Engineering, Transport Infrastructure System

“Before coming to study in Chile, many Brazilians told me that the country was very rich and I was really surprised by the quality of life of Chileans. The country is very modern and living here is better than I imagined.
[…] I love the cultural climate of Chile. I can go to concerts, the theater, walk around and listen to artists in the streets and squares. Definitely what impresses and enchants me the most about Chile is its cultural climate.”

Pedro Magalhaes

Computer Engineering

“My main reason for going on an exchange was that I wanted to learn Spanish. I decided to come to Chile because I study history and I feel that 20th century Chilean history is very interesting.
[…] For example, when I arrived, I got lost looking for my apartment. I asked a person on the street and they said, 'I don't know, but I'll call someone who does.' My feeling is that people care about the safety of us foreigners.”

Carolin Hennrick

History

“Without a doubt, what I liked most about Chile was the relationship that I developed with its people. Being able to share my experience with a Chilean family, living with them, made me feel like just another Chilean. […] More than just going to classes, it was the people who were there that enriched my knowledge.
[…] Sleeping under the amazing stars and waking up in the middle of the desert is priceless. This trip has been a fantastic story that I will tell my children, grandchildren, etc. for my whole life."

Pablo Valverde

Art

No. 1 best university
in Latin America

and 19 of the 100 best in the region.

Source: Times Higher Education Ranking 2021.

Innovación y Emprendimiento

INNOVATION & ENTREPRENEURSHIP

SEEKING TO IMPROVE OUR QUALITY OF LIFE AND CREATE A BETTER FUTURE FOR CHILE AND THE WORLD, WE DRIVE ENTREPRENEURSHIP, SUSTAINABILITY AND LOCAL TALENT TO BECOME A GLOBAL HUB FOR INNOVATION.

THE PATH TO A MORE SUSTAINABLE FUTURE IS CLEAR…
AND GREEN!

“Chile plays a broad and deep role (…) It is responding efficiently to a great challenge and is setting a new world record for the cheapest solar energy, building power plants in places that allow Chile to export energy to other parts of Latin America as well as plants that generate green hydrogen from renewable energies”.

AL GORE

Nobel Peace Laureate and former Vice President of the United States,
June 2021 (interview on TVN channel)

Our goal is to be the first developing country
to reach

carbon neutrality,
between now and 2050.

#1 in the world in clean energy investment and solar energy generation.

Source: Bloomberg Climatescope Ranking 2020.

We produce 17% of our energy from solar and wind power,

positioning us at #13 in the world with the highest % of electricity produced using these two renewable sources.

Source: Ember's Global Electricity Review 2021.

LEADING PLAYERS IN THE ERA OF
GREEN HYDROGEN

Chile is aiming to be the world's cheapest producer of green hydrogen by 2030 and one of the top 3 global exporters by 2040.

This is “Haru Oni”, the first green hydrogen plant in Chile, which will manufacture e-Fuels.

The project will obtain green hydrogen from water using wind energy, after which a synthesis process will be carried out with CO2 captured from the atmosphere to produce methanol. From this, gasoline will be obtained that can be used in conventional, unmodified vehicles, thus allowing for carbon neutral transport!

“Haru Oni” will be located in the Magallanes Region and exports of this fuel will be key for the world to reach the goal of carbon neutrality by 2050.

Chile's capital —Santiago de Chile—
is the city with the most electric buses
in the world after Chinese cities.

We place our bets on
electromobility

Santiago Metro

140 km long.
2nd largest in Latin America.

Mano del desierto,
Mario Irarrázabal,
1992

#1 in Latin America for
INNOVATION and ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Sources: Global Innovation Index 2020 and Global Entrepreneurship Index 2020.

The best business accelerator in the region and global top 10:

Start-Up Chile, the world's first public business accelerator, has supported more than 1,900 companies from 85 countries.

Source: Global Innovation Management Institute.

DISCOVER HOW CHILEAN TALENT
IS CREATING A BETTER FUTURE

OPEN AND CONNECTED
BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT

  • The world's largest free trade network.
  • Leader in Latin America in digital connectivity.
  • Public policies to support innovation and entrepreneurship.
  • Open to entrepreneurs from all over the world.

WE PRODUCE 28%
OF THE PLANET’S COPPER

Mano del desierto,
Mario Irarrázabal,
1992

AND WE ARE THE
WORLD'S FIRST EXPORTER
OF COPPER CATHODES.

THE WORLD'S
BATTERY

48% OF WORLDWIDE LITHIUM RESERVES

Turismo y Deporte

TOURISM & SPORTS

OUR DIVERSE AND EXTREME TERRITORY, SOUTH OF THE SOUTH, INVITES US TO CONNECT AND TAKE CARE OF OUR SURROUNDINGS.
WE HAVE A NATURAL FIELD THAT IS PERFECT FOR SPORTS AND ADVENTURE, WHERE WE CAN SHARE UNIQUE EXPERIENCES AND PROTECT THE FUTURE OF OUR PLANET.

WELCOME TO
ADVENTURE TOURISM

In the most spectacular natural sports field, south of the planet!

World's Leading Adventure Tourism Destination 2016 - 2017 - 2018 - 2019 - 2020

World's Leading Green Destination 2019 - 2020

Mano del desierto,
Mario Irarrázabal,
1992

from the driest desert
to the southernmost city in the world...

A unique experience south of the south!

42 national parks

6,435 km of coastline

More than 2,900 volcanoes

376 lakes,
lagoons and reservoirs

7 different climates

43,471 islands

More than 40
astronomical
observatories

More than 270
hot springs

More than 1,750 glaciers,

equivalent to 76% of the glaciers in South America and 3% of the country's surface.

21.5% of the territory
is covered by native forests

A desert...

blooming and full of life!

The Atacama Desert, one of the driest on the planet, surprises the whole world when it blooms from time to time. It is also home to the largest reproductive colonies of seabirds on the planet such as Markham's storm petrels, Hornby's storm petrels and grey gulls.

Nearly

25%

of our more than

31.000

NATIVE SPECIES

are endemic.

More than 50% of the species
of marine mammals
that exist in the world

live in Chilean waters.

Like the Chilean dolphin!

(Cephalorhynchus eutropia)

7 UNESCO World
Heritage Sites:

Historic quarter of Valparaíso

The slopes of Cerro Alegre harbor this natural amphitheater
looking out to the Pacific.

Churches of Chiloé

There are 16 rustic wooden churches in
Chiloé that fall into this category.

Chinchorro mummies

The Chinchorro mummies, found in the Arica y Parinacota Region, are the oldest known throughout the world to date (6,000 to 2,000 BC).

Sewell Mining Town

"The city of stairs" was home to the El Teniente
copper mine workers.

Inca Trail: Qhapac Ñan

Millennial trail from the Inca era, which passes through 6 countries
in South America, including Chile.

Rapa Nui National Park

On the most remote island on the planet, you will find
the park featuring the imposing moais that date from 300 AD

Humberstone and Santa Laura Saltpeter Works

A place steeped in history with the vestiges of the golden
age of saltpeter.

Unique landmarks and monuments

Cerro Dragón

A large dune located within the city of Iquique (Tarapacá Region), in northern Chile, that has become a geographic and urban landmark. At 4 kilometers long, it covers an area of 337.53 hectares, making it one of the largest urban dunes in the world.

Giant of Atacama

Located in the district of Huara (Tarapacá Region), in the Atacama Desert, this figure is the largest anthropomorphic geoglyph in the world.

Church of San Francisco de Chiu Chiu

According to the parish archives, this church dates to before 1611, as it had already been constituted as such by this date. It is considered to be one of the oldest preserved churches in Chile.

Malleco Viaduct

With a height of 102 meters, the Malleco Viaduct, in the La Araucanía Region, is one of the largest metallic engineering works in Chile, and was considered in its time to be the highest railway bridge in the world.

Rock art in Patagonia

In the vicinity of General Carrera Lake (Aysén Region), there are rock art depictions that make up the so-called "Patagonian Art Style," which is the oldest in South America.

Dungeness Lighthouse

It is located on the north bank of the Magellan Strait, in the southernmost region of Chile. Its structure has a height of 25 meters and a luminous range of 22 nautical miles. It is the only lighthouse that illuminates both the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans.

Mano del Desierto

In the heart of the Atacama Desert, south of the city of Antofagasta, this iconic 11-meter sculpture by Chilean artist Mario Irarrázabal rises up from the sand. Huge stone hands made by the same artist are also found in Punta del Este, Madrid and Venice.

Negocios y Exportación

BUSINESS & EXPORTS

FROM THE SOUTHERN EDGE OF THE WORLD, WE ARE CONNECTED AND COMMITTED TO THE GLOBAL ECONOMY, CREATING A RELIABLE AND DYNAMIC BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT FOR TRADE AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT.

REGIONAL
LEADER

No. 1 Economic competitiveness for more than 20 years.

Source: World Economic Forum

No. 1 Business environment.

Source: Economist Intelligence Unit 2020-2024

No. 1 Economic freedom.

Source: Heritage Foundation 2020

“Chile’s case is so interesting because it is the country that has made the most progress in the last 30 years. It has the best institutions and industries such as retail and agribusiness are also very sophisticated. […] Chile is becoming really exciting”.

Nicolás Szekasy

Co-founder of Kaszek Venture, former executive of Mercado Libre
(July 2021, interview by Diario Financiero)

Mano del desierto,
Mario Irarrázabal,
1992

Latin American
business hub

  • THE WORLD'S LARGEST FREE TRADE NETWORK.
  • GATEWAY TO THE PACIFIC ALLIANCE.
  • AGREEMENTS WITH 65 INTERNATIONAL MARKETS.
  • ACCESS TO 4.9 BILLION CONSUMERS.

EVERY DAY, AROUND THE WORLD:

82 million

people eat fresh Chilean fruit.

EVERY DAY, AROUND THE WORLD:

23 million

glasses of Chilean wine are enjoyed.

EVERY DAY, AROUND THE WORLD:

10 million

people consume a portion of Chilean salmon.

EVERY DAY, AROUND THE WORLD:

12 million

people eat a serving of Chilean pork.

EVERY DAY, AROUND THE WORLD:

638 thousand

people eat a handful of healthy Chilean nuts.

Chile is among the
25 largest food exporters
in the world.

No. 1 in exports of:

  • Wines in the New World (outside of Europe)
  • Fresh cherries
  • Fresh plums
  • Dried apples
  • Dried plums
  • Sea urchins
  • Seaweed
  • Canned mussels
  • Salmon and trout fillets

Vida y Cultura

LIFE & CULTURE

CHILE'S DIVERSITY AND CULTURAL RICHNESS FUEL OUR CREATIVITY. WE CONNECT OUR LEGACY WITH THE TALENT OF THE NEW GENERATIONS, TO CREATE NEW STORIES AND EXPERIENCES FROM CHILE TO THE WORLD.

CHILE BEGINS
WITH “C” FOR
CREATIVITY

CHILEAN TALENT

CREATIVITY FROM
THE EXTREME SOUTH
FOR THE WORLD

Nobel Prize
in Literature

GABRIELA MISTRAL

Nobel Prize
in Literature

PABLO NERUDA

Miguel de Cervantes Prize
for Spanish-language Literature

NICANOR PARRA

Miguel de Cervantes Prize
for Spanish-language Literature

JORGE EDWARDS

Miguel de Cervantes Prize
for Spanish-language Literature

GONZALO ROJAS

Oscar for Best
Animated Short Film

HISTORIA DE UN OSO

Oscar for Best
Foreign Film

UNA MUJER FANTÁSTICA

240 international

film awards since 2009

Pritzker Architecture
Prize

ALEJANDRO ARAVENA

Member of the UNESCO
Creative Cities Network

VALPARAÍSO

Member of the UNESCO
Creative Cities Network

FRUTILLAR

CINEMA FOR
THE WORLD

+ than 200 feature films
+ than 200 short films
+ than 200 documentaries
in the last decade.

As Don Pablo said:

"[...] And to the table
Come, newly wed,
The savors
Of land and sea,
That in this dish
You may know heaven."

Excerpt from "Ode to Conger Chowder", 1954
Pablo Neruda

Mano del desierto,
Mario Irarrázabal,
1992

CHILE'S CONSTITUENT PROCESS:

CREATING OUR FUTURE THROUGH A DEMOCRATIC AND HISTORIC PROCESS WITH OUR CITIZENS

Chile is experiencing a moment of historical transformation. Our country chose to carry out a constituent process by means of a plebiscite, which has been celebrated around the world for managing to channel social concerns through institutional channels, while respecting democracy.

A new social pact will be the foundation for us to build our future. This will be possible thanks to a Constitutional Convention of 155 members elected by popular vote. It is the first in the world to have gender parity and reserved seats for indigenous peoples.

In the drafting of the new Constitution, the character of the Republic of the State of Chile, its democratic regime, its final and executed judicial decisions and the international treaties currently in place and ratified by Chile must be respected.

The Convention has 9 months to present a new constitutional text. This term may be extended only once for 3 more months. Finally, in mid-2022, another plebiscite will be held to approve or reject the new Magna Carta for Chile’s future.

MULTICULTURAL
HERITAGE

Of our 19.5 million inhabitants,

more than 2 million people

declare that they belong to one of the
10 native peoples recognized by the State of Chile:

AYMARA

The Aymara are the second largest indigenous people in Chile (after the Mapuche), according to official data. Today, they are identified by their language, their Andean culture and the land on which they live in the Arica and Parinacota, Tarapacá and Antofagasta Regions. Aymara communities live in the altiplano, which spans a large zone that includes Lake Titicaca and its surrounding areas (Bolivia), Chile’s Norte Grande and northwest Argentina.

Notable in the Aymara culture are their textiles, which showcase great technical expertise and detail and are used primarily for clothing and ceremonial pieces. Music and dance are two very important cultural expressions, while the Aymara are also known for their silver jewellery and other ritual objects.

ATACAMEÑO OR LIKAN ANTAI

The Atacameño or Likan Antai live in the valley, oases and gorges of the Salar de Atacama and the upper Loa River basin and its Salado River tributary, in the municipalities of Calama and San Pedro de Atacama, located in the Antofagasta Region. The Atacameño speak the Kunza language and many refer to themselves as Likan-Antai, a Kunza word meaning “inhabitants of the land”.

Atacameño culture is famous for its pottery, basket weaving, textiles, jewellery making, dance and music. The traditional Atacameño economy is based on agriculture and livestock.

QUECHUA

The Quechua people are recognized by their language, also called Quechua. Their communities are located in the regions of Ollagüe and the San Pedro River, a tributary of the Loa River in the Antofagasta Region. The area has a historic relationship with the Salar de Ayuna (Bolivia) and economic links to the Loa River basin and the Pacific coast. Quechua communities have also been established at the Mamiña oasis and the towns of Quipisca and Miñi Miñe, in the municipality of Pozo Almonte in the Tarapacá Region. The Quechua economy is based on livestock and agriculture and the people have conserved artisan crafts such as pottery and textile arts.

COLLA

The Colla currently live in a part of the Atacama Desert, in some of the gorges of the Andean foothills and along the edge of the high plateau of the Copiapó and Chañaral provinces in the Atacama Region, although some also now live in towns and cities.

Their traditional economy is based on livestock and, to a lesser extent, agriculture. Colla women practice the cultural activity of textile craftwork using looms and knitting sticks, organized either in workshops or as individual ventures.

CHANGO

The Chango people are keepers of a traditional maritime way of life along the coastal regions of Antofagasta, Atacama and Coquimbo. One of their most distinctive cultural symbols is a raft made of sealion skin, which is unique in the history of maritime navigation. The Chango adapted their culture to be able to prosper along a coastal strip that provided little fresh water, plants for human consumption or land animals; because of this, they did not develop agricultural or livestock practices.

Today, the Chango recognize the sea and fishing coves as key aspects of their identity, as the places where their ancestors and now they have built their lives. Beyond the resources that it provides, the ocean has a life of its own.

The Chango people were officially recognized as a Chilean indigenous ethnic group following a law that was passed in 2020. Around 4,000 people identify as a member of this group.

DIAGUITA

The Diaguita originally lived on both sides of the Andean Mountain range. On the Chilean side, prior to the arrival of the Spanish, they lived in the valleys of the Norte Chico – Copiapó, Huasco, Elqui and Limarí-Choapa in the regions of Atacama and Coquimbo.

It was in the Huasco Valley, specifically along the Tránsito River, that the Diaguita reclaimed their ethnic identity. This led to official recognition of the Diaguita in 2006 and their incorporation as an indigenous people of Chile, through the modification of the Indigenous Law Nº 19.253.

Diaguita pottery (pots and crockery) and textile production are two of their main traditional crafts.

RAPA NUI

Rapa Nui or Easter Island is located in the middle of the South Pacific, 3,700 kilometers from the South American continent. It forms part of the Valparaíso Region.

80% of the population is concentrated in Hanga Roa, a town that is the capital of both the island and the province. The island also possesses five fishing coves (Hanga Piko, Hanga Roa Tai, Hanga Ho’onu or La Perouse, Hanga Nui and Hanga Te’e en Vaihu). The remainder of the population lives throughout the island’s rural areas.

The Rapanui economy is based on agriculture, complemented by marine products such as small molluscs and fish, like tuna. Just prior to the year AD 690, monumental religious architecture appeared along the island’s coastal areas, the famous Moai, erected on ahu or rock platforms, either as single statues or in rows of up to 15.

MAPUCHE

The Mapuche are the most numerous of Chile’s indigenous peoples, representing 78% of those who identify as indigenous. Today, Mapuche communities are found in the area bordered in the north by the Biobío River and its Queuco River tributary, in the Biobío Region, and in the south by the island of Chiloé, in the Los Lagos Region.

The Mapuche worldview is rich and diverse, connected to the very order of the world through forms of material and symbolic expression that are expressed in rituals, ceremonies and nature.

The Mapuche possess a vast cultural heritage. In its intangible form, it is composed of the Mapudungún language, a deep knowledge of nature and the relationship between human beings, oral tradition and spiritual and healing processes, as well as religious beliefs and practices.

KAWÉSQAR

It is thought that the Kawésqar arrived in Chile’s southern canals about 6,000 years ago. Settlement theories suggest that they came from the north and arrived following routes through the canals that begin in Chiloé, before crossing the Isthmus of Ofqui. Other theories suggest that they came from the south, with origins in the hunting people of Eastern Patagonia who became seafarers.

Originally, the Kawésqar travelled by canoe and were nomadic hunter-gatherers. They lived in what is now Puerto Edén and Punta Arenas in the Magallanes and Chilean Antarctic Region. Adorned in shell and feather necklaces, they wore animal-skin cloaks, whose material varied according to territory (sealion and deer). They decorated their faces and bodies with stripes and geometric designs.

YAGÁN

The Yámana or Yagán is the name of the world’s southernmost canoe-faring people, who lived on the islands south of Tierra del Fuego, between the Beagle Channel and Cape Horn. Today, the last Yagán families are found in Villa Ukika and Bahía Mejillones, close to Puerto Williams in the Magallanes Region.

They are recognized as a nomadic people who hunted, gathered and fished. The canoe was central to their way of life and was made from the bark of tree, which was cut and formed into a gondola shape.

Our diversity is

also enriched thanks to the nearly

1.5 million immigrants

who have chosen to live in Chile, mainly coming from:

Venezuela

30,5%

Perú

15,8%

Haití

12,5%

Colombia

10,8%

Bolivia

8%

Santiago

Viña del Mar

Antofagasta

Concepción