Congratulations to the recipients of the Strait of Magellan Award for Innovation and Exploration with Global impact.

These are the explorers of the XXI century, who embody the same spirit of those who accomplished the epic achievement that connected the world: 500 years ago.

THESE ARE THE INTERNATIONAL RECIPIENTS
OF THE STRAIT OF MAGELLAN AWARD FOR INNOVATION AND EXPLORATION WITH A GLOBAL IMPACT.

Dr. Ximena Hartsock - UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Phone2Action is a software platform designed to amplify organizations’ advocacy by interacting with communities and their subjects of interest.

Mr. Yuan Longping - CHINA

The father of hybrid rice.

Prof. Dr. Bertram Nickolay - GERMANY

Method for virtual reconstruction of shredded documents

Dr. Brian Schmidt - AUSTRALIA

2011 Nobel Prize in Physics winner for providing evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating.

Md. Abel Pascual Albino - ARGENTINA

Founder and president of CONIN: Corporation for Child Nutrition.

Dr. Harold Jennings - CANADA

Developed vaccine against meningitis C.

Ban Ki-moon - SOUTH KOREA

As Secretary-General of the United Nations, he mobilized world leaders around a set of new global challenges, from climate change and economic to pandemics and other important issues.

Karen Christiana Figueres Olsen - COSTA RICA

For her innovative leadership in all challenges related to climate change.

Dr. Ibrahim El-Sherbiny - EGYPT

Smart cost-effective single-dose nano wound bandage for monitoring and fast healing of diabetic wounds.

Haile Gebrselassie - ETHIOPIA

He set 27 world records and is considered one of the best long-distance runners of all times.

Corinne Dettmeijer-Vermeulen - NETHERLANDS

Arnold Antonin - HAITI

Haitian Filmaker

Madhurita Gupta - INDIA

Maria Uca Marines - ROMANIA

Nicolás Jodal - URUGUAY

Marina Salandy-Brown - TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

AppsForGood - UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. Jaime Incer - NICARAGUA

STORIES WITH A NARROW CONNECTION

RĂŤO SECO MUSEUM - EPISODE 1

The RĂ­o Seco Natural History Museum is a project that seeks to preserve the region's flora and fauna, thus becoming a scientific development hub, promoting research for the region's heritage and establishing a strong connection with the strait.

MARLBOROUGH - EPISODE 2

Chilean writer Óscar Barrientos tells us the story behind the ship that inspired his book “The Skeleton Boat”, about the mystery of Marlborough; the ship that sailed for 23 years only to appear in the Magallanes Region, crewed by 23 human skeletons.

LA GALERĂŤA (The Gallery) - EPISODE 3

“La Galería” (The Gallery) is a cultural space focused on local art, promoting different disciplines such as plastic arts, music and audiovisual works. It holds diverse exhibits inspired by the unique landscapes of this region in which two oceans meet.

INACH - EPISODE 4

The Chilean Antarctic Institute seeks to promote the scientific development of the Chilean Antarctic territory by enhancing Punta Arenas city in the Magallanes Region, as a gateway to the white continent. Learn more abou their important labor here.

ESTRELLAS DEL SUR - EPISODE 5

For Chilean Marine Biologist Erika Mutschke, the Strait of Magellan holds many secrets under the sea. That's why her research on starfish seeks to find a connection between South American and Antarctic starfish by going deeper into the waters and fjords of the Magallanes Region.

THE ADVENTURE THAT CONNECTED THE WORLD

ESPACIO PARA MOSTRAR LA ENTREVISTA A LA PERSONA RELEVANTE

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On September 20, 1519, a fleet commanded by the Portuguese captain Ferdinand Magellan, comprising five ships and around 250 men, sailed out of the port of SanlĂşcar de Barrameda in southern Spain heading for the Atlantic. Its mission: To discover new western routes to the Spice Islands (Moluccas Islands).
The purpose of this journey was to discover a shorter route, which was the intention of Christopher Columbus when he found the American continent. But Magellan made an even greater discovery, one that was to change the course of history. Magellan’s expedition made the first ever journey around the world.

Once the journey began, they traveled through the Canary Islands and first stopped in Tenerife before sailing between the Cape Verde Islands and the coast of Guinea. The fleet then got ready to cross the Atlantic in the direction of America.

After several months of travel and tremendous weather challenges, the fleet approached the coast of America. Finally, on December 13, 1519, they reached land at the port of Santa LucĂ­a, which is today RĂ­o de Janeiro.

One of the most difficult moments was the search for a route to the west of the continent. After RĂ­o, they traveled south along the coast. It was a hard winter and the conditions for the crew were difficult and this led to the loss of one ship and the desertion of another. After various attempts, they decided to explore an uncharted channel on November 1, 1520.

It was here, and after many difficulties, that they managed to successfully cross through that strait that connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Today it is known as “the Strait of Magellan,” but at that time it was called the “Strait of All Saints” because they ventured through it on All Saints’ Day. While they moved through the strait, they spotted numerous fires along the coast that had been lit by the indigenous people living in the area. That’s why the area was named “Tierra del Fuego” or “Land of Fire.”

As they crossed through it and finally saw the entrance to the sea, the crew wept tears of joy. They named the place “Cabo Deseado” or “Cape of Desire.” On November 28, 1520, Magellan and his fleet sailed for the first time in the southern sea that was called “Pacific” because it was so serene and tranquil. Magellan and his fleet could scarcely have imagined what new adventures and challenges were awaiting them in the vast Pacific.

The Pacific was much larger than they had expected and so Magellan and his fleet sailed for four long months. The crew battled hunger and illness as they searched for firm, inhabited land where they could stock up on supplies.

It was not until

March 6, 1521

— by that time in extreme conditions — that they approached the island of Guam in what is today the archipelago of the Marianas Islands. It was then known as the “Islands of Thieves” due to the unfortunate way its inhabitants welcomed newcomers.

They reached the Philippines, which Magellan called the “Saint Lazarus’ Islands,” on March 16. Here their adventure took a fatal turn.

On April 7, they disembarked on the first island, Cebu, where Magellan forged a peaceful trade relationship with its king.

But 20 days later, in the early hours of April 27 on the nearby island of Mactan, Magellan and his men came up against the indigenous leader Lapulapu and his followers, with whom they failed to reach the same understanding that they had achieved on Cebu. It was there that Magellan died at the point of a lance, ending his journey and command of the fleet.

After Magellan’s death, the difficulties continued. But the goal of finding a western route to the Moluccas remained unchanged. With only two of the five original ships remaining — the Trinidad and the Victoria, now under the command of Sebastián Elcano and staffed by just half of the original crew — the fleet made its way past various islands until reaching its destination on November 7, 1521.

They docked at Tidore Island on November 8. There they were received in peace and had the opportunity to restock and buy valuable spices to take back to Spain.

On December 18, 1521, the two ships got ready to set off back to Spain, but the Trinidad needed repairs. They agreed that it would return later via the Pacific Ocean. Meanwhile, the Victoria, with Elcano at the helm and ever fewer crew members, was to try to circumnavigate the globe according to Magellan’s original plan.

The voyagers crossed the Indian Ocean and made their way around Africa, struggling once again with the hunger, dangers and illnesses involved in another long journey on the open sea. Finally, on September 6, 1522, the ship reached SanlĂşcar de Barrameda, the port from which it had set sail. There were just 18 crew members on board: the first 18 men to travel right around the world.

On September 8, the damaged but triumphant Victoria reached Seville. It was being towed by another boat but had Elcano and his crew aboard and local officials and residents were there to welcome them.

The next day, on September 9, 1522, the 18 men disembarked for the last time, in their shirts and barefoot. Their voyage to the End of the Earth and beyond had ended and they had succeeded in connecting the entire world for the very first time.

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